2 April 2021 – Good Friday. Again

I loved last Easter. Don’t get me wrong, it was a shit show of epic proportions, but in the space of five days, I’d offered gruel to the sea gods, made hot cross buns, planted parsley, created a Franken-bunny-mouse-chick pom pom monster, didn’t eat a yard of cheese, Pace-egged, and held an online Dregg Race where I dressed an egg to look like Alexis Carrington circa Dynasty 1981. And while I’m not a huge fan of repetition, which granted is a little odd given I’m a folklorist, I thought I would do a quick Good Friday: Almost One Year On post. Or something.

Good Friday is the traditional day to make hot cross buns. So I did. And then hung it up in my kitchen. The whys, hows and wherefores are all here:

Good Friday: Almost One Year On and ta da! The bun is still dangles. I did think about dusting away the cobwebs, but who doesn’t like a bit of aged authenticity? I’d like to think my bun is still protecting me from evil spirits. Just obviously not spiders.

2020 vs 2021

The next was the parsley. Out of all of the herbs I started growing last Good Friday, the parsley is the only one that survived. However, if I’m being really honest, this is more to do with the unappetising mildew, rather than any diligent cultivation on my part. But it’s proof that I’m both witch and rogue, so it can sit on my windowsill for as long as it likes.

Bonus bean update: It’s said that the shortest day is the best day to sow broad beans (see also St Valentine’s Day, St David’s Day and St Chad’s Day). You last saw them looking like this:

And now they look like this. Well, most of them:

The longest stalk is about 5ft. And there are a lot of flowers going on, so fingers crossed for some sort of crop. And if anyone has any warts they’d like cured by the furry inside of one of my pods, just let me know.

Have a lovely weekend, and may the bunny bring you lots of chocolate. Although, of course, the bunny used to be a hare. But that’s another story…


Resources:

Ewart Evans, G. and Thomson, D. (1972) The Leaping Hare, London, Faber and Faber Ltd.

Vickery, R. (2019) Vickery’s Folk Flora, An A-Z of the Folklore and Uses of British and Irish Plants, London, Weidenfeld & Nicolson 

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5 Comments

  1. Glorious Barbara
    3 April 2021
    Reply

    I think your dusty bun looks very appetising. Can’t believe it’s been a year since you set it a-dangling! Should my ear affliction return, I shall be requesting your furry pod most urgently.

    • 3 April 2021
      Reply

      And my furry pod shall always be yours. As for the bun, get your own.

  2. Glorious Barbara
    4 April 2021
    Reply

    😀

  3. Rachel Fonseka
    7 April 2021
    Reply

    Thank you, Liza – I love reading your posts! Rachel

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