9 November 2020 – London’s East End Customs and Traditions

Where to start. You know when you’re so bursting with pride and awe and admiration for a friend, that stringing a sentence together that doesn’t sound disingenuous or sycophantic is practically impossible? Well, that’s how I’m feeling right now.

I’ve just listened to my friend, Jaymie Tapsell give a talk about London’s East End customs and traditions for The Friends of Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park Online series. And it was so good. She seamlessly blended folklore from Pearly Kings and Queens to fantasy coffins of the East End Ghanaian community, from hanging hot cross buns at The Widow’s Son Pub to Brick Lane beigels. 

There were eel pies and soundscapes, Spring Heeled Jack and pram races, hipsters and book recommendations (in Resources). And I know I’m biased, but my mate was great! The talk will be online soon, so I’ll post the link when I get it as it’s well worth the watch. She also gets a 10/10 for giving great background bookshelf. 

Also a big shout out to another lovely friend, Claire Slack, Heritage Officer at The Friends of Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park for arranging the talk. They have another online event in a couple of weeks on plant prints (details in Resources), the talks are free but please donate if you can.

What an absolutely belting way to start the week. I need a cup of tea. 


Resources

Header: Mirrorpix

The Friends of Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

https://www.tickettailor.com/events/thefriendsoftowerhamletscemeterypark/433069

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/48614

https://www.charlesdickenspage.com/night-walks.html

https://spitalfieldslife.com

Clothing the Poor in Nineteenth-Century England by Vivienne Richmond

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