18 July 2020 – I Ching

I posed a question to a group of friends this morning, and Hildegunn of the Turks Turbans (not a euphemism) suggested I do some divination to help sort myself out, so I did. I tried a bit of I Ching. There are several ways to practice I Ching, but not having stumbled across a patch of yarrow on one of my foraging expeditions, I used three coins. They can be any old coins, but one source said that using coins with a significance can help with the divination, so I raided my change jars and found an Australian 10¢, a New Zealand 50¢, a Japanese 10¥. That was a good trip. 

I Ching is an ancient form of Chinese divination that relies on a system of yin lines (broken) and yang lines (unbroken), changing lines, 64 hexagrams each representing a different answer, heads, tails and six tosses. It didn’t help that the book I started working from had different values attached to the heads and tails giving me completely different hexagrams to my other sources. So I abandoned that and went online. 

My tossing technique for the first two questions was rattling the coins between my palms and then expelling them onto a table. Each throw has a value attached to it depending on how the coins fall. This is then translated into a line of the hexagram, and when all six have been completed, the resulting hexagram can be read. And given there are 64 possible outcomes, I was pleasantly comforted by the I Ching answers returned. 

For my final question, I gave myself up to the I Ching to give me a general steer on my life. To mix things up a bit, I thumb flicked each coin off my forefinger. And again the resulting answer felt surprisingly pertinent. Which I know is the point, but I still got a tingle reading the answers and consequently my consternation has decreased slightly. There are a couple of helpful I Ching sites in the Resources below if you want to have a go. And if you use an autogenerated coin toss, it’s even easier. Plus they’ll explain the whole shebang much better than I’ve done. 

So from I Ching to I Scream. Ice cream. From yesterday. Which I may or may not have had for elevenses this morning. It was crunchy. I’ve never actually had an ice cream that made a noise before. When I took it out of the freezer, it was so hard my spoon bent. I was under the impression that adding vodka would give it a soft scoop effect. But like my pestle pies, I had to saw through it. I’m guessing my lacklustre whisking caused this crispiness. Nevertheless it was gorgeous. And once my teeth stop aching, I might just go back for thirds.


Resources

Struthers, J. (2007) The Psychic’s Bible, London, Octopus Publishing Group Ltd

https://www.eclecticenergies.com/iching/

http://the-iching.com

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4 Comments

  1. Susannah
    19 July 2020
    Reply

    What did the coins say?

  2. Glorious Barbara
    19 July 2020
    Reply

    It sounds like you had perfected your tossing technique by the end of the session

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