13 November 2020 – Friday the 13th. Again

It’s Groundhog Day Friday the 13th. Again. The last one was in March. I gambled. Unsuccessfully. For this one, I made fuzzy dice. Obviously.

It’s said that airmen in the Second World War used to place 2 dice on their consoles, configured to make lucky number seven, before going off on a mission. It’s also supposedly a play on the concept of rolling the dice, given that many airmen didn’t return. After the war these dashboard dollies went from the air to the road, becoming a good luck symbol for drivers. And given the way this year has gone, I figured I could do with some 1970s retro luck.

But as I am toast, I’m going to let the pictures do the talking. See you after the slide show.

So the acorn, I explain it here. Like I said, I’m tired. Just one last thing to add, I only have a small stash of fun fur, and choose the white more out of necessity than thinking about the colour. It was only when I got to the ribbon stage and confirmed red is a lucky colour in China, that I thought to check out how the Chinese feel about white. The love wasn’t there. So I may have just cancelled myself out. Except, white is also said to be fortunate for Cancerians. So I might be back in the game. Either way, I’m off to bed. I might check under it first though. After all, it is Friday the 13th. Again.


The Everyday Lore Project has been running since St Distaff’s Day on 7 January 2020 and will run until 12th Night on 6 January 2021. I’m too knackered to explain the madness, instead scroll back up to the search icon and pick a date or two since 7 Jan and search for them. You’ll get the measure of what I’m up to. And then subscribe! You really don’t want to miss this last bit.

Resources

https://www.thebalanceeveryday.com/lucky-charms-to-attract-good-luck-895277

https://www.liveabout.com/history-of-fuzzy-dice-527558

https://www.wikihow.com/Sample/Paper-Cube-Template

https://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/culture/lucky-numbers-and-colors-in-chinese-culture.htm

http://goodlucksymbols.blogspot.com/p/good-luck-colors.html

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